Mikaela Bandini's insider Italy http://urbanitaly.com the travel guide to contemporary Italy Thu, 28 Apr 2016 11:57:51 +0000 en-EN hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.3 Corneliano Bertario | Osteria del Castellohttp://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/corneliano-bertario-osteria-del-castello.html http://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/corneliano-bertario-osteria-del-castello.html#comments Wed, 27 Apr 2016 16:52:54 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4662 Screen Shot 2016-03-21 at 20.01.50Corneliano Bertario is a medieval hamlet in idyllic surroundings of farmland and woods, not far from the banks of the Adda river in Lombardy and included in the riverine conservation area. It’s only 25 km east of Milan and yet it feels like another planet. And yet (again) it has one of the hippest hipster addresses in the …]]> Screen Shot 2016-03-21 at 20.01.50

Corneliano Bertario is a medieval hamlet in idyllic surroundings of farmland and woods, not far from the banks of the Adda river in Lombardy and included in the riverine conservation area. It’s only 25 km east of Milan and yet it feels like another planet. And yet (again) it has one of the hippest hipster addresses in the whole region.

Family-run, if not in quite the conventional sense of the term, Osteria del Castello is an utterly contemporary, combination concept of fine eatery, inclusive club, live music venue, retreat and vintage heaven, all arranged in and around an ancient yard with a spectacular wisteria arbour.

The family in question goes by the surname Scaglione. With the acumen and polish of an entrepreneur in the fashion world, Paolo Scaglione founded the business in 1997, bracketing traditional osteria fare with a refined ambience. Now it’s in the capable hands of the subsequent generation, three brothers in as many roles, each according to his lights and talents: Tobia the general manager, Miki the chef and Leopoldo the maître d’ and sommelier. Neat, huh?

The yard itself, dining rooms off to the left and a series of other quarters variously intended for drinking, smoking, relaxing by an open fire, playing pool etc. are all Osteria-branded with an artful and immeasurable clutter of stuff and styles from times gone by. There’s simply no end to the wondrous variety of antique or retro finishings and furnishings, bar supplies and objects standing on or hanging from every available plane.  And some of it is for sale in the Osteria del Castello‘s very own antiques and bric-à-brac market. The atmosphere’s a direct consequence of the design concept: very laid-back, somehow inclusive and exclusive at the same time, a home-from-home very alert to its own, singular fascination.

And the menu? Well, Tobia sums it up as originating in various parts of northern and central Italy (Piedmont and Tuscany as well as Lombardy, mostly), revisited and honed at the Osteria over the years, redesigned every morning while doing the rounds of markets and farms, and in preparation right now in the kitchen. Which just about says it all, from the traditional recipes to the freshness and quality of ingredients to the attention to detail. It’s short and sweet. Take a look here. For a group of 10 or more, they’ll do a tasting menu, the whole works at a fixed price.

Osteria events include a weekly delirio gastronomico with live music as well as festive menus and entertainment. They’re open to organizing ad hoc, bespoke events too.

Osteria del Castello
Piazza Gallarati Scotti 8
Corneliano Bertario
20060 Truccazzano MI
+39 02 958 3063
tienimiuntavolo@osteriadelcastello.it for bookings, or book online

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/corneliano-bertario-osteria-del-castello.html/feed 0
Florence | Aquazzurahttp://urbanitaly.com/shopping/clothes/florence-aquazzura.html http://urbanitaly.com/shopping/clothes/florence-aquazzura.html#comments Wed, 20 Apr 2016 15:45:57 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4973 Screen Shot 2016-04-14 at 15.24.11No design lovers’ tour of Florence, let alone a retail jaunt, would be complete without checking out the Aquazzura flagship store on Lungarno Corsini. For several good reasons. First of all, though only in their fourth year, Edgardo Osorio‘s collections are already legendary. At the venerable age of 25, after studying fashion and design in London …]]> Screen Shot 2016-04-14 at 15.24.11

No design lovers’ tour of Florence, let alone a retail jaunt, would be complete without checking out the Aquazzura flagship store on Lungarno Corsini. For several good reasons.

First of all, though only in their fourth year, Edgardo Osorio‘s collections are already legendary. At the venerable age of 25, after studying fashion and design in London and styling footwear for several international houses of luxury including Ferragamo and Cavalli, he launched his own upscale brand of simply elegant, sexy but never extreme shoes and sandals. And has never looked back. Styles are beautiful and/or striking but wearable, smartly designed and superbly crafted. Some of his signature styles – like the Belgravia flats and Wild Thing sandals – are practically classics, revisited every season and sported by iconic fashionistas the world over. And by a few common mortals too, though cheap thy are not.

Next, the building. The store itself, Aquazzura HQ and Colombian Edgardo Osorio’s chosen residence are all in monumental Palazzo Corsini, built in the 1600s for Grand Duke of Tuscany Ferdinand II, no less, and decorated by the cream of Florentine painters of the time. The Aquazzura store gives you a taste of its sumptuous halls.

And finally the store design. For within that majestic 17th-century context, Portugese designer sisters Cláudia e Catarina Soares Pereira have created a wholly different breed of exotic elegance with black-and-white flooring in optical motifs, torrid turquoise volumes and furnishings, museum-style glass display cases for recherché footwear, and potted banana plants. 

All in all, and whether or not you resist temptation, a sight to behold.

Aquazzura – Boutique Florence
Lungarno Corsini 42R
50123 Firenze
+39 055 291242
boutique.florence@aquazzura.com 

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/shopping/clothes/florence-aquazzura.html/feed 0
Col Gallina | Starlight Roomhttp://urbanitaly.com/sleeping-around/col-gallina-starlight-room.html http://urbanitaly.com/sleeping-around/col-gallina-starlight-room.html#comments Wed, 13 Apr 2016 14:21:54 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4901 Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 17.57.51Let’s suppose, for the sake of argument, that you’re the adventurous kind, on the lookout for unique locations, spectacular views, hospitality with a difference. And maybe that tree-house accommodation is already so last year in the panoply of your experience. May we suggest a glasshouse at the top of a mountain? Don’t, for goodness sake, think …]]> Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 17.57.51

Let’s suppose, for the sake of argument, that you’re the adventurous kind, on the lookout for unique locations, spectacular views, hospitality with a difference. And maybe that tree-house accommodation is already so last year in the panoply of your experience. May we suggest a glasshouse at the top of a mountain?

Don’t, for goodness sake, think of the Glass House, or of any architectural masterpiece modern or contemporary, or even of a house. This is more like a greenhouse sort of glasshouse, more or less the size of the one at the bottom of your garden, but with (almost) all the cons of a mod hotel room and all on its own at just over 2000 m AMSL in the UNESCO-listed Dolomite mountains. On runners. Honestly.

The plan for the mobile room with star-gazing facilities (glass roof, glass walls) was hatched by Raniero Campigotto, manager of nearby mountain refuge Rifugio Col Gallina. It was made up by local craftsmen down in Cortina d’Ampezzo (the high-society resort is only 20 km away) in wood and metal as well as glass, and pulled or pushed to its panoramic perch in an area known as Lagazuoi – 5 Torri – Giau.

Whence you have a front-row bed to be wowed by stunning mountainscapes in the glow of orange sunsets, star-studded night skies without a flicker of artificial light to dim them, and pink dawns. 

There’s a queen-size bed in there (motor-adjustable to a sitting-up position for your convenience), electric lighting, heating, a big screen so you can scare yourself silly watching Everest and an MP3 device for music. Other perks include chocolates, grappa and thermal pyjamas. The bathroom – this has to be said – is not en suite. It’s outside. But then you’re unlikely to find it occupied by anyone else.

For one or two guests, with a slap-up dinner and breakfast at the refuge and transport (on snowshoes or by some kind of snowmobile when necessary) to the Starlight Room included, it’ll cost around 300 euros per night. Guaranteed unforgettable.

Images are by Cortina-based photographer Giacomo Pompanin.

Starlight Room Dolomites
Rifugio Col Gallina
Passo Falzarega (BL)
+39 0436 2939 / +39 339 4425105
rifuguio.colgallina@dolomiti.org

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/sleeping-around/col-gallina-starlight-room.html/feed 0
Palermo | PerciaSacchihttp://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/palermo-perciasacchi.html http://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/palermo-perciasacchi.html#comments Wed, 06 Apr 2016 14:55:53 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4833 Screen Shot 2016-03-11 at 19.30.15When in Palermo, try PerciaSacchi for a taste of Sicily that’s off the well-beaten tourist track. On a pint-sized square among the labyrinthine alleys of the ancient district of Il Capo, which lends its name to one of the city’s famous animated and colourful daily markets, PerciaSacchi is more into mellow-and-charming than design, but then that’s more …]]> Screen Shot 2016-03-11 at 19.30.15

When in Palermo, try PerciaSacchi for a taste of Sicily that’s off the well-beaten tourist track.

On a pint-sized square among the labyrinthine alleys of the ancient district of Il Capo, which lends its name to one of the city’s famous animated and colourful daily markets, PerciaSacchi is more into mellow-and-charming than design, but then that’s more in keeping with its spirit.

The guiding principle at the intimate pizzeria-cum-restaurant is farm-to-fork. It was on the frontline of what would happily become, even this far south, a trend for Slow-Food-style ethics and zero food miles when it opened some 3-and-a-bit years ago, and still strives daily to perfect the concept.

PerciaSacchi is a group of friends who share a passion as well as a profession. They source their raw materials locally as far as possible, in any case know exactly who produces them, and how, sometimes help with the harvest themselves and follow the trail right onto your plate. So obviously the menu changes with the seasons and even week by week, according to the availability of good, fresh produce. 

It’s a spirit which naturally embraces respect for the environment and for local customs. The menu is inspired by time-honoured, regional recipes, favouring those simple dishes in which few components complement one another but not excluding innovative interpretations which enhance rather than overturn the traditions.

And then there are the classical slow rhythms of these parts to be heeded, particularly where doughs and yeasts entail processes that can’t be rushed. If PerciaSacchi isn’t only a pizzeria, it certainly has a vocation for quality baking. The odd name is in fact that of an ancient variety of wheat cultivated on the Med’s largest island. It prides itself on using only flours stone-ground from durum wheat or other grains historically grown there, and its own active yeast, for all the memorable baked specialties it serves.

Those crafty pizzas come in a few classic versions and many seasonal or very specifically Sicilian ones, with cheeses you won’t find elsewhere, the freshest Pachino tomatoes and/or the salted, cured fish roe called bottarga, for example. Choice of starters, pasta dishes, mains, salads and desserts is more limited, more defined by the seasons and governed by a criterion of quality over quantity: still all as beautifully presented as they are contrived. Excellent Sicilian wines and microbrewery beers complete the experience.

Open only evenings, by the way. 

PerciaSacchi
Via del Monte di Pietà 5
90134 Palermo
+39 091 6123960 / +39 366 9057162
info@perciasacchi.it

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/palermo-perciasacchi.html/feed 0
Monte Specie | Lookouthttp://urbanitaly.com/architecture/contemporary/monte-specie-lookout.html http://urbanitaly.com/architecture/contemporary/monte-specie-lookout.html#comments Wed, 30 Mar 2016 15:58:42 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4536 Dolomites_LookOut-02A small thing, it might seem, a new observation point in the Dolomites. Not to the UNESCO Dolomites Foundation, set up to devise and coordinate the overall governance and management of the Dolomites UNESCO World Heritage site. When it decided on around 20 new information and lookout points at outstanding panoramic locations, the Foundation called …]]> Dolomites_LookOut-02

A small thing, it might seem, a new observation point in the Dolomites.

Not to the UNESCO Dolomites Foundation, set up to devise and coordinate the overall governance and management of the Dolomites UNESCO World Heritage site. When it decided on around 20 new information and lookout points at outstanding panoramic locations, the Foundation called in both brother-and-sister architecture firm Messner Architects (David and Verena) and Messner Sr, better known as Franz Messner, sculptor of metals, to fulfil some stringent criteria. Their idea, in keeping with the Foundation’s mission for conservation, communication and enhancement in and of the natural environment, was to make a contemporary architectural modification of the landscape, a small-scale and low-impact addition, well-embedded in its surroundings. 

The first one was opened last summer on Monte Specie, 2300m asl, in the heart of the Fanes-Sennes-Braies nature reserve, within the South Tyrolean municipality of Dobbiaco.

It’s a viewing platform based in slightly raised ground and floating above it in the lookout direction: a steel casing filled with earth and rubble from the site, rectangular on the outside but with a path leading down to a circular inner ‘chamber’, waist-high. And that’s it. Just enough. Information on all the peaks visible is given in a stainless steel profile around the edge of the inner circle, while there’s more about the Dolomitic landscape and geology in general on the outer edge of the platform.

Come closer and look carefully at this sight, without a shadow of a doubt one of the most beautiful, powerful and extraordinary things on this planet.

        Dino Buzzati on the Dolomites

Monte Specie Lookout
39034 Dobbiaco (BZ)

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/architecture/contemporary/monte-specie-lookout.html/feed 0
Milan | XX1Thttp://urbanitaly.com/art-design/milan-xx1t-2.html http://urbanitaly.com/art-design/milan-xx1t-2.html#comments Wed, 23 Mar 2016 17:13:30 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4839 Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 19.52.20Probably the most prestigious institution dedicated to the arts in Italy, the Triennale di Milano has finally revived the practice from which it took its name, that of grand triennial international exhibitions. It’s been 20 years since the last proper one, a millennium has turned, much has changed in the world, and the theme of the …]]> Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 19.52.20

Probably the most prestigious institution dedicated to the arts in Italy, the Triennale di Milano has finally revived the practice from which it took its name, that of grand triennial international exhibitions. It’s been 20 years since the last proper one, a millennium has turned, much has changed in the world, and the theme of the long-awaited, new and improved, 21st International Exhibition of 2016 aka XX1T is, appropriately enough, 21st Century. Design After Design’.

Design has gone global and creativity bursts from every corner of five continents; it’s become, necessarily, transversal among traditional arts disciplines but also increasingly tied up with social shifts, communities, regional issues and local cultures; markets are global too, and ever more fickle. So XX1T asks and aims to answer some burning questions on the present and future of design.

How? With an across-the-board event comprising not only exhibitions lasting the full five months (from April 2 to September 12) but also lectures and conferences, performances and workshops, shows, festivals and competitions on a daily and/or weekly basis. International participants hail from 30 countries and run the gamut from whole states, regions and cities to universities and schools, businesses and individual professionals.

The monumental Palazzo dell’Arte in Parco Sempione, the Triennale’s home since it was purpose-built in 1933, will naturally be the epicentre of XX1T, but at least 10 more venues around the city and in Monza (where the first ever international exhibition of decorative arts in Italy was held in 1923) are involved in hosting 20 exhibitions and all the rest. In Milan, they include BASE Milano and the MUDEC in Zona Tortona, and others as diverse as the Diocesan Museum, the Pirelli HangarBicocca out in the northern reaches, both city campuses of the Politecnico university, and part of the Expo Milano 2015 area.

Keep an eye on XX1T for the full programme. But don’t miss the exhibition W. Women in Italian Design at the Palazzo dell’Arte itself, curated by Triennale director Silvana Annicchiarico, or a series of ideas on the future of cities coordinated by Pierluigi Nicolin, City after the City at the Expo Milano 2015 area (starting later, probably in May). But also Architecture as Art at the HangarBicocca, and Cino Zucchi’s highly-developed reflections on contemporary architecture in Sempering at the MUDEC….  Actually, don’t miss any of them, if you can, in five more hot months in Milan.

XXI International Exhibition
Triennale di Milano
Viale Alemagna 6
20121 Milano
+39 02 724341
contacts

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/art-design/milan-xx1t-2.html/feed 0
Bologna | È Cucinahttp://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/bologna-e-cucina.html http://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/bologna-e-cucina.html#comments Wed, 16 Mar 2016 16:11:41 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4765 Screen Shot 2016-03-16 at 17.38.15È Cucina is a restaurant with another name, without which you only know the half of it. That name is Cesare Marretti: chef, restaurateur, designer and campaigner for healthy eating (and an active lifestyle) all rolled into one patently eccentric figure.  Before settling in Bologna, he’d collected experiences around the globe and refined a distinctive …]]> Screen Shot 2016-03-16 at 17.38.15

È Cucina is a restaurant with another name, without which you only know the half of it. That name is Cesare Marretti: chef, restaurateur, designer and campaigner for healthy eating (and an active lifestyle) all rolled into one patently eccentric figure. 

Before settling in Bologna, he’d collected experiences around the globe and refined a distinctive concept. It’s all about simplicity, appreciating the inherent qualities of even modest foodstuffs, preparing them simply, rapidly, apparently artlessly, and serving them in uncommon, sometimes ironic combinations. Part and parcel of this is the selection of prime quality raw materials, and a Marretti idée fixe is that every dish should include vegtables and/or fruit. He takes desserts very seriously too. You get well-presented food on your plate rather than a work of art, but art and design of an exuberant, unpretentious stripe are a trademark of the restaurants themselves, guaranteed to make you smile. 

È Cucina, to sum up plainly, is lively and fun; the food’s good and healthy and, believe it or not, low-cost.

One way of keeping things simple is the set-price menus depending on how many courses you can take, but always with a choice of meat, fish or vegetarian. Lunch moves quickly with drinks and coffee included, as befits working folk in a hurry, while dinner is more polished and leisurely. 

È Cucina Leopardi in Bologna is in the centre of town but modestly located away from the main drags, in ex-industrial premises just off Via Marconi. Crockery lines the walls and hangs from the ceiling along with sundry cutlery in gay abandon. Bicycles are another theme. The kitchen is open and bustling with activity, and shelving piled with boxes of fruit and veg forms the séparé between the entrance and the main dining area. It’s delightful.

There’s another Cesare Marretti place in Bologna, called È Cucina 24, in practice the eatery of 4 Viale Masini Design Hotel. There you get breakfasts and bar meals as well as lunches and dinners in a slightly different format but still at bargain rates (for my two cents, though, it can’t compare for ambience). Last summer there was even a temporary È Cucina in the park, the Parco della Montagnola: al fresco dining to the strains of Jazz in the Park. And both Rome and Turin can boast an È Cucina too.

But don’t be influenced by its second name, or the brand: just try È Cucina in Via Leopardi (all the photos were taken there) and see if it doesn’t make you happy.

È Cucina Leopardi
Via Giacomo Leopardi 4
40122 Bologna
+39 051 2750069
cesaremarretti@gmail.com

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/food-wine/hot-spots/bologna-e-cucina.html/feed 0
Rome | Istanbul. Passion, Joy, Furyhttp://urbanitaly.com/art-design/rome-istanbul-passion-joy-fury.html http://urbanitaly.com/art-design/rome-istanbul-passion-joy-fury.html#comments Wed, 09 Mar 2016 16:21:37 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4836 Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 13.51.55Perhaps there’s never been a better time to get a grasp of the Turks. Well, right now you can start at the MAXXI, by taking a good long look at a fascinating exhibition curated by the Museum’s Artistic Director Hou Hanru, among others, and entitled Istanbul. Passion, Joy, Fury. Naturally, this being the MAXXI, contemporary Turkey - especially …]]> Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 13.51.55

Perhaps there’s never been a better time to get a grasp of the Turks.

Well, right now you can start at the MAXXIby taking a good long look at a fascinating exhibition curated by the Museum’s Artistic Director Hou Hanru, among others, and entitled Istanbul. Passion, Joy, Fury.

Naturally, this being the MAXXI, contemporary Turkey - especially Istanbul – is presented via its artists and architects. Still, the themes covered in 7 chapters through the exhibition are far-reaching and intrepid: political conflict and cultural identity;  urban transformation; innovative models of production; geopolitical emergencies; and hope. And the overall aim is to show what makes today’s Turkey tick, how it’s changing and which cultural issues are currently astir. No less.

The exhibition wades boldly into the fray with big architectural plans and ideas, innovative art, and also analyses, reflections and first-hand accounts from the artists and architects participating, around 50 if you count them all as individuals (some are partners), Turkey’s finest. Using multiple media, it grapples unflinchingly with social, political, economic, religious, moral, ecological and urban planning issues.

In the first chapter of the exhibition, a wonderful animated film, Rose Garden with the Epilogue by Extrastruggle, and a series of gripping photographs by Osman Bozkurt are among the stories from the Gezi Park protests of 2013. More photos by Serkan Taycan illustrate the unfettered expansion of the city, while Turkey’s eight foreign borders and the influx of refugees are the focus of a film made by Cynthia Madansky and Angelika Brudniak. The experimental architects, and specifically three emerging firms Herkes Için Mimarlik/Architecture for All, Pattu and So?, come into their own in a chapter called To Build or not to Build, with site-specific installations representing models for public and private spaces in Istanbul. But these are just a few of the exhibits, almost random mentions, a drop in the ocean.

The impression is of struggle and resistance across the board, a reflection of the conflicting forces in play in modern Turkish society; but also of boundless creative energy, youthful ambition and optimism. It’s all very impressive, and uplifting.

Culture is mix. Culture means a mix of things from other sources. And my town, Istanbul, was this kind of mix.

            Orhan Pamuk

The sally into Istanbul is the second of a series undertaken by the MAXXI to explore cultural realities in the Mediterranean and relations between the Middle East and Europe in general. In 2014 they looked at contemporary art in Iran, and an exhibition concentrating on Beirut is planned for 2017.

Istanbul. Passion, Joy, Fury runs until April 30th 2016.

MAXXI - Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo
Via Guido Reni 4A
00196 Roma
contacts

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/art-design/rome-istanbul-passion-joy-fury.html/feed 0
Milan | Laboratorio Paravicinihttp://urbanitaly.com/art-design/milan-laboratorio-paravicini.html http://urbanitaly.com/art-design/milan-laboratorio-paravicini.html#comments Wed, 02 Mar 2016 16:35:51 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4670 vetrinaIf anyone’s still not convinced that excellent craftsmanship survives and indeed thrives all over Italy, here’s another sublime example. Actually, this is craftswomanship, white earthenware production to be precise, and of the very highest order, as accomplished by Costanza Paravicini.  She’s been at it for more than 20 years, in her own backyard in the …]]> vetrina

If anyone’s still not convinced that excellent craftsmanship survives and indeed thrives all over Italy, here’s another sublime example. Actually, this is craftswomanship, white earthenware production to be precise, and of the very highest order, as accomplished by Costanza Paravicini. 

She’s been at it for more than 20 years, in her own backyard in the heart of old Milan, creating bespoke pots of a type and quality apparently consigned to memory lane by industrial production. 

Laboratorio Paravicini is still known to few, devoted customers who prefer their tableware very fine, completely handmade and custom-decorated. That said, a line of contemporary print designs in limited editions, which debuted more or less when Costanza’s designer daughter Benedetta Medici joined her in the atelier, outed the brand and made a splash during Design Week 2015 with a Collection signed by artist Vittore Frattini.

The Paravicini workshop makes its own extra-thin, white ceramic biscuit – pottery after its first firing for those not versed in such matters – in a series of profiles. These pieces are then decorated freehand, using printed designs, or even impressed while still soft. They’re then glazed and fired at high temperature to make them safe and suitable for everyday use, even dishwasher-proof. It’s a time-honoured process that makes for a brilliant white earthenware and intense colours, and that goes for entire dinner services or unique centrepieces.

You can visit during the morning, Monday to Friday, without an appointment, but call to arrange an afternoon meeting.

And if you’re in town for Design Week 2016 (April 12th to 17th), don’t miss a surprise event called Play Plate launching a new collection, on Wednesday 13th in the evening, at the Paravicini atelier.

Laboratorio Paravicini
Via Nerino 8
20123 Milano
+39 02 72021006  /  +39 333 7041292 
laboratorio@paravicini.it

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/art-design/milan-laboratorio-paravicini.html/feed 0
Gergei | Domu Antigahttp://urbanitaly.com/sleeping-around/gergei-domu-antiga.html http://urbanitaly.com/sleeping-around/gergei-domu-antiga.html#comments Fri, 26 Feb 2016 16:22:20 +0000 http://urbanitaly.com/?p=4474 Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 12.43.52If your real Sardinia is its rugged interior still rife with ancient rural customs, a unique language and Bronze Age remains, as opposed to a spectacular, celebrity-studded coastline, then we have the B&B for you.  An early-19th-century farmhouse in the village of Gergei, at the extreme southern tip of the Gennargentu mountains, Domu Antiga has been restored to …]]> Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 12.43.52

If your real Sardinia is its rugged interior still rife with ancient rural customs, a unique language and Bronze Age remains, as opposed to a spectacular, celebrity-studded coastline, then we have the B&B for you. 

An early-19th-century farmhouse in the village of Gergei, at the extreme southern tip of the Gennargentu mountains, Domu Antiga has been restored to period perfection along with all appurtenances and trimmings. Every mod con is present and correct (except for televisions – there’s a small library instead) but carefully integrated into a renovation that made scrupulous use of traditional materials and techniques, following principles of green architecture from a time that knew no other colour. So the domu antiga - Sardinian for ancient house – features bare or whitewashed stone, wood, cork and reeds. Furniture, fabrics and objects are either antique or produced by traditional craft workshops. 

Samuel and family let three superb, en suite rooms in the handsome complex, all with balconies overlooking cobbled streets. Breakfast, served in the farmhouse kitchen with a fire in the grate when it’s cold outside or out in the backyard in the warmer months, is as Sardinian custom decrees, including an egg so fresh-laid you can collect it from the henhouse yourself. Other meals, home-cooked to the same high standards, are available on request. 

Gergei, in an area of hills and wide uplands known as the Sarcidano, numbers just 1,300 inhabitants. It’s surrounded by olive groves, vineyards and pastures where sheep and goats graze. Samuel and/or family and friends can involve you in the grape or olive harvest and all they entail depending on the time of year, and offer cooking courses rooted in the local tradition.

A little further afield are more stunning landscapes, some of the finest Bronze Age remains at Barumini (another UNESCO World Heritage site) and at Giara di Serri, the lakes and marshes and wild herds of diminutive horses at Giara di Gesturi, and much more. Domu Antiga can arrange a guide and mountain bikes or donkey trekking to visit some of these. 

B&B Domu Antiga
Via 4 Mori 3
08030 Gergei (CA)
+39 0782 808174 / +39 347 9210309
info@domuantiga.it

]]>
http://urbanitaly.com/sleeping-around/gergei-domu-antiga.html/feed 0